Guest Post by Claire Hastings. Claire is now a monthly contributor to IAmDanElson.com which I’m super excited about! Let Claire get you into the Christmas spirit Aussy style with another awesome guest post!

Claire is a wanderer and a writer. She is editor and contributor of several online magazines, and very proud to be part of an international Dolce Placard team as a fashion editor. You can follow Claire on Twitter.

Chrissy time: Secrets of Aussie festive style

Is it Christmas yet? If it weren’t for the calendar countdown, us Aussies wouldn’t really have a compass for such festiveness – our gorgeous Down Under is almost always warm, so as far as we’re concerned – Chrissy can fall on any day of any month, throughout the year. No, really.

In all honesty, we do have Christmas blues from time to time, as we rarely ever see a drop of snow or get to enjoy the lovely tradition of building a snowman but, you know what? We do just fine surfing instead. As long as there’s joy. Ho ho ho!

For all of you who would love an insight into a typical Australian fuzzy hot Christmas time, we’re breaking down a few Aussie Christmas traditions you’ll probably have a tough time processing – especially if you’re the one carolling around.

Ok, here it is:

Our Christmas Tree Is Okay

christmas-tree-Australia

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Unlike those spectacularly decorated trees in the movies, reaching the ceiling and glittering in Christmas lights and ornaments, ours are… well, not as dramatic.

First, there’s no fireplace or else we’d all collapse from the heat.

Second, the tinsels are almost always uneven (it’s really too hot to care) and the pomp about it isn’t even close to what it should be at this time of year. But we do have a lot of green bushes and trees around which compensates a bit.

On a Christmas morning, we’ll run downstairs to see the presents waiting under the Christmas tree and then after we’ve hectically opened every single one of them, we’ll run out for an ice-cream or a dip. Awesome, right?

We, Too, Carol

…not in a way other people do, but hey – it’s all got its advantages.

Well no, not all does really (at least carolling doesn’t) but we’ve all grown accustomed to the “Australianised” versions of Christmas carols that we’ll always sing along to while, obviously, rolling our eyes to every beat.

Perhaps the most heinous, but always played is the “Rusty Holden Ute” version of Jingle Bells followed by “I’m dreading another dry Christmas” which mixes an adorable and very disturbing flair of patriotism and flystrike. It’s a coping mechanism, really.

We’ll mock everything that has to do with snow just because we’d love to witness it at least once. Hilarious.

Christmas Fashion Is Summery

While one of the cutest things about Christmas are the tacky reindeer lumpy sweaters, Uggs and huge caps and hats (with the whole ensemble rarely ever looking fashionable), Aussies will give you an entirely different approach to Christmas wear.

To us, Christmas is the perfect time to show off our style and upgrade it with a few festive tricks.

While most Aussies are boho throughout the year (or spending time in their swimwear), Christmas is when we all pull out a little bit of drama and edge.

Still, the materials are always easy, we go for a lot of colour and – to honour Christmas – we might even embrace the green and red combos.

Naturally, this isn’t the case always as some would rather go for something silver, goldish or angel white.

It’s all about ditching the casual on this day and channelling stylish wear.

Girls love dresses that are weather appropriate but very sensual at the same time, like phenomenal party dresses and tropical kaftans; guys ditch their surfing gear and Hawaiians, and go for light (often white) pants and cotton flowy shirts.

It all looks pretty sweet, I must admit.

We Have s Snowman, Too

…but we call it Sand-man. A man made of sand, get it? That’s about it.

snowman-Australia

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Booze And Food Are… Different

christmas-food-Australia

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While some families don’t stray from the European traditions of a very heavy feast like the turkey, red meats, sour cream salads and God knows what (and then spend most of their family lunch complaining about having to prepare all that in this crazy heat), others are embracing other traditions – mangoes, cherries and seafood.

A true Australian Christmas can’t fly without a bowl of cold cherries somewhere on hand, mangoes in all possible variants –  smooshed into cocktails, diced for salsa to serve with prawns, crabs or even roast pork or used as a refreshing base for a (true) Christmas cake and – lots and lots of seafood.

As for the drinks, while you probably love your cooked wine and whatnot, Aussies go for something cold, crisp and sharable. The way we see it, nothing pairs better with a turkey or ham than a crisp, salt-air manzanilla sherry, all while the sand is dancing between your toes.

Fun, right? Maybe you should make your next Christmas an Aussie one. We’ll be happy to welcome you.

About The Author

Claire-Hastings-guest-post-iamdanelson

Claire Hastings is our first monthly contributor! Claire is a wanderer and a writer. She has been writing for as long as she can remember, and she is very passionate about fashion, running, other cultures, and her cat. Claire is an editor and contributor of several online magazines, and is very proud to be part of an international Dolce Placard team as a fashion editor. Follow Claire on Twitter

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Chrissy time: Secrets of Aussie festive style | Guest Post
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Chrissy time: Secrets of Aussie festive style | Guest Post
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Chrissy time: Secrets of Aussie festive style. Claire is back! And with a bang providing those of the world the secrets of a fun packed christmas in Australia!
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